Freemasonry FAQ

Freemasonry FAQs

WHAT IS FREEMASONRY?

Freemasonry offers its members an approach to life which seeks to reinforce thoughtfulness for others, kindness in the community, honesty in business, courtesy in society and fairness in all things. Members are urged to regard the interests of the family as paramount but, importantly, Freemasonry also teaches and practices concern for people, care for the less fortunate and help for those in need.

WHY DO PEOPLE JOIN AND REMAIN MEMBERS?

People become Freemasons for a variety of reasons, some as the result of family tradition, others upon the introduction of a friend or out of a curiosity to know what it is all about. Those who become active members and who grow in Freemasonry do so principally because they enjoy it. They enjoy the challenges and fellowship that Freemasonry offers.

WHO CAN JOIN?

Membership is open to men of all faiths who are law-abiding, of good character and who acknowledge a belief in a God (Supreme Being). Freemasonry is a multi-racial and multi-cultural organisation. It has attracted men of goodwill from all sectors of the community into membership. There are similar Masonic organisations for women.

WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS TO BE A FREEMASON?

People might think that to become a Freemason is quite difficult. It’s actually straightforward. The essential qualification for admission is that you have a belief in a Supreme Being. It is usual for candidates to be “mature men of 21 years and over”, but younger candidates may be admitted with the approval of Provincial Grand Lodge.

HOW DOES FREEMASONRY RELATE TO RELIGION?

Freemasonry has no theology, and no particular faith. A belief in a ‘Supreme Being’ is an essential requirement for membership, but our “Volume of the Sacred Law”, which is usually a bible in our lodge, could just as easily be the Koran, Torah, Granth Sahib, or Bhagavad Gita.

WHAT ARE FREEMASONRY’S SECRETS?

Like many societies, our ordinary lodge meetings are open to members only. Our secrets relate to traditional modes of recognition between freemasons. Our constitution and rules are freely obtainable from Grand Lodge. There is little else that any freemason would not be happy to discuss.